Corn Season

This time of year in New England fresh “Corn on the Cob” is king!

And while many people are busy thinking up new ways to use up all the Zucchini, I spend my time thinking up ways to eat more fresh corn!

The latest way…..

“Fresh corn pudding with roasted sweet potatoes & red bell pepper!”

(served with grilled steak or not)

final plate

 

The key here is the not only the 4 cups of fresh raw corn taken right off the cob, but the roasted sweet potato.

Sweet potatoes - Simply peeled, cubed, drizzled with oil, salt & pepper. Roast at 400 degrees till tender and browed a bit.

Sweet potatoes – Simply peeled, cubed, drizzled with oil, salt & pepper. Roast at 400 degrees till tender and browned a bit.

Tip: Scrub and roast your potatoes in the cool summer nights and make the corn pudding the next day or better yet if early morning is your thing, get it all done before the heat of the day sets in.

Another Tip: I like roasting potatoes or any veggies just to have on hand for quiche fillings, sandwich stuffers, omelets or quesadilla.

 

the recipe

2 cups cubed, roasted sweet potatoes

1 small-medium sweet red bell pepper diced

1 cup small dice white onion

4 cups fresh corn kernels (be sure to reap the “milk” from the cobs too!)

1 heaping TB fresh chopped sage

1/2 cup melted and slightly cooled butter

4 medium size eggs (adjust according if yours are smaller or bigger)

1 Tsp Baking Powder

1 1/4 cup finely ground corn meal (yellow or white okay)

1 1/4 cup “half and half”* or Whole milk     *I used fat-free because that is what I had but I think it would be richer with full fat.

salt and pepper to taste

preheat oven to 375 degrees and spray an 8×12 baking dish with non-stick cooking spray.

mix the potatoes, onion, bell pepper, corn kernels and corn milk together and dump into the baking dish. In another bowl mix the butter, eggs, sage and baking powder together. Alternately whisk in the cornmeal and milk (or half and half) – watching consistency. The batter should be thick but still very pourable. You may end up using more or less of one of these two ingredients. Salt and pepper should be added in and pour over the veggies in the baking dish. Cover tightly with foil and bake 30 minutes, uncover and bake 20 more mins. Baking time may vary – the edges should be brown and the middle firm but soft – kinda like quiche.

Serve hot, warm or room temperature.

 

Can You Really Ever Get Enough…

…of grilled food?

on the grill

Especially in the short New England summer season?

I can’t. I just love to take advantage of the grill for dinner (or lunch or breakfast even) and getting outside to cook. It also reminds me to water the garden too. (Although that sometimes leads to “well-done” grill food. But the “flavor is in the brown right?”)

Here is a classic grilled meal!

grilled chicken dinner

Marinated & grilled chicken with grilled veggies and cole slaw!

Like my meatloaf, my marinades are never the same!

To make my marinade, I simply combine some oil, (extra virgin olive is nice but almost any will do) some acid, (lemon juice or vinegar) salt/pepper and whatever spices strike my fancy that day. Mix it up in a little dish as a “flavor concentrate” – tasting it until you basically have the same balance as a strong salad dressing, then add a little cold water to “extend” the volume of marinade to cover whatever cut of meat you plan on using. Pour over meat and refrigerate until grill time! This could be an hour or it could be a day.

This chicken had a citrus influence with lemon-pepper seasoning, coriander seed, and cumin.

 

Tropical Twist

Recently I was inspired to put a tropical twist on an old favorite: stuffed peppers.

It might have been the gorgeous colored bell peppers at the store inspiring me or perhaps I was just craving a lighter version of this dish. Whatever it was – I am pleased with the results.

tropical stuffed pepper

I also decided to keep things light by using ground pork instead of beef.And of course I used some rice – a lazy bag of frozen white/wild rice blend. I also added in some frozen corn kernels and a bit of leftover shredded carrots that was kicking around the fridge.

But the real tropical twist was the use of fresh pineapple!

Chopped fresh Pineapple along with the diced tops to the peppers, Maui sweet onion and garlic!

Chopped fresh Pineapple along with the diced tops to the peppers, Maui sweet onion & garlic!

A good dose of teriyaki sauce (use your favorite brand) and some freshly grated ginger also packed some flavor into this dish!

Light, tasty and many tropical miles away from your standard stuffed pepper recipe, this really delivered!

 

The Recipe:

Note:  Mine made plenty of filling for 4 decent size peppers, but I only had two HUGE peppers so I just cooked the extra filling in the dish along with the stuffed peppers and then used it to help the peppers stand up on the plate.

 

3/4 lb +/- ground lean pork

7 oz cooked rice (could be a bit more or less)

2-3 garlic cloves, minced

1 small onion or half of a sweet onion like Maui or Vidalia

2-4 large peppers to stuff

1 tb minced fresh ginger

1 cup small diced fresh pineapple

the pepper “tops’ diced small

4-5 tb teriyaki Sauce

Salt and pepper to taste

Oil for browning meat in pan

Brown the onions, diced pepper tops and meat in a bit of oil in a saute pan. (pork is really a ‘white’ meat so it won’t really get too “brown” but use some butter too if you really want some color!) Add the garlic about 1/2 way through so it doesn’t burn. Add S&P to taste along the way. Add the fresh pineapple, ginger and teriyaki sauce to deglaze the pan and coat everything. Take off heat and add cooked rice, stirring to combine. At this point you could cool the filling and fill the washed, cored and topped peppers and refrigerate until time to bake. Otherwise stuff the peppers and surround them with any remaining filling. (personally I like to spray the baking dish with cooking spray to make sure nothing sticks) Bake in preheated oven at 375 degrees, covered tightly with foil to keep things moist for about 30-40 minutes. Check and see how tender the peppers are – if they need more time to get tender then recover and bake longer. I like to finish my peppers by removing the cover and baking about 10-15 mins just to get a little brown on top.

 

 

My Perfect Supper

Everybody has one. For some it might be simple and for others it could be quite gourmet.

For me it always have to involve tomatoes in some way. And beef.

There is just something magical about that combination that really works for me. Any combination will do: from meatloaf and ketchup all the way to a more “high-brow” Beef tenderloin stuffed with sun-dried tomatoes! I love it all!

Somewhere in the middle of homespun and gourmet is where my simple, perfect supper is:

perfect supper

Grilled steak with juicy sliced fresh tomatoes (Big slices of “brandywine” variety are best but really any tomato works) and a simple potato salad, best enjoyed on a perfect New England summer evening, on the porch.

 

What’s your idea of a perfect supper?

Fruit Cubes

When I have extra fruit that I might not get to in time I like to puree it and freeze it for later use.  You can just simply puree the washed, clean fruit and freeze it or add some honey or sugar to it before freezing for instant drink mixes!

Certainly I didn’t invent this great idea but I do like to inspire and remind folks that it is a perfect way to have fruit on hand for blending smoothies, flavoring ice teas or my favorite adult beverage… “boat drinks!”

I use small 2-3 ounce containers so each one is just a portion size.

I use small 2-3 ounce containers so each one is just a portion size. (Make sure to leave a little room at the top for expansion!)

Parrot Head

I am a card-carrying member of the “parrotheads” elite.

And if you think I raise and breed birds you would be wrong.

For those who don’t know a “parrothead” is a big time fan of Jimmy Buffett’s music. We even have our own wiki page here!

So after having attended over 6 shows and many related events over the years, you would think I would have the lyrics to one of his most famous songs, “Cheeseburger In Paradise” perfectly memorized. Well I do, but recently I cleared up some grammatical confusion.

See I thought he was saying ” …not zucchini fettuccine or bulgar wheat…”  but what he was really saying was “not zucchini, fettuccine or bulgar wheat “

Small difference (see comma marked in red above) but it means the difference between 3 food items ( Zucchini AND Fettuccine AND Bulgar Wheat) instead of two food items. (Zucchini Fettuccine AND Bulgar Wheat)

Phew! glad I cleared that up!

zucchini 2

Actual “zucchini fettuccine” lightly sautéed in olive oil with fresh tomatoes, herbs, garlic,onions and a little feta cheese on top!

 

In case you want to verify the lyrics or maybe even catch a show…. www.margaritaville.com

Grilling Versus Braising

I have to admit that although I have enjoyed a classic Texas-style BBQ beef short rib many times, I never really made the connection that this was the same/similar beef “short rib” (sometimes just shorter I think and possibly called “English cut” sometimes) that we all like to cook during the New England wintertime in a slow braise of flavorful, red wine liquid served over something creamy like Polenta or garlic mashed. You can see my version of this here.

I still didn’t make the connection when I was at the store shopping for meat and thought to myself  “boneless short ribs on the grill, why not – it could work!” I thought I was breaking new grilling territory here.

So I brought them home and considered myself all clever by whipping up a little dry rub concoction of ground black pepper, kosher salt, ground cumin and ground ancho chili powder. After a suitable time I grilled them over high heat on my backyard grill till a perfect medium. (medium rare for the next time might be better as these were pretty lean cuts)

Served with grilled mushrooms, zucchini and onions, they made for a perfect “new” adventure on the grill!

(until I googled it and realized this was not “breaking new ground” stuff!)

grilled beef short ribs

These happen to be boneless and fairly lean, but on the bone would be delicious too and could benefit, I would imagine, from a wet marinade.