Tropical Twist

Recently I was inspired to put a tropical twist on an old favorite: stuffed peppers.

It might have been the gorgeous colored bell peppers at the store inspiring me or perhaps I was just craving a lighter version of this dish. Whatever it was – I am pleased with the results.

tropical stuffed pepper

I also decided to keep things light by using ground pork instead of beef.And of course I used some rice – a lazy bag of frozen white/wild rice blend. I also added in some frozen corn kernels and a bit of leftover shredded carrots that was kicking around the fridge.

But the real tropical twist was the use of fresh pineapple!

Chopped fresh Pineapple along with the diced tops to the peppers, Maui sweet onion and garlic!

Chopped fresh Pineapple along with the diced tops to the peppers, Maui sweet onion & garlic!

A good dose of teriyaki sauce (use your favorite brand) and some freshly grated ginger also packed some flavor into this dish!

Light, tasty and many tropical miles away from your standard stuffed pepper recipe, this really delivered!

 

The Recipe:

Note:  Mine made plenty of filling for 4 decent size peppers, but I only had two HUGE peppers so I just cooked the extra filling in the dish along with the stuffed peppers and then used it to help the peppers stand up on the plate.

 

3/4 lb +/- ground lean pork

7 oz cooked rice (could be a bit more or less)

2-3 garlic cloves, minced

1 small onion or half of a sweet onion like Maui or Vidalia

2-4 large peppers to stuff

1 tb minced fresh ginger

1 cup small diced fresh pineapple

the pepper “tops’ diced small

4-5 tb teriyaki Sauce

Salt and pepper to taste

Oil for browning meat in pan

Brown the onions, diced pepper tops and meat in a bit of oil in a saute pan. (pork is really a ‘white’ meat so it won’t really get too “brown” but use some butter too if you really want some color!) Add the garlic about 1/2 way through so it doesn’t burn. Add S&P to taste along the way. Add the fresh pineapple, ginger and teriyaki sauce to deglaze the pan and coat everything. Take off heat and add cooked rice, stirring to combine. At this point you could cool the filling and fill the washed, cored and topped peppers and refrigerate until time to bake. Otherwise stuff the peppers and surround them with any remaining filling. (personally I like to spray the baking dish with cooking spray to make sure nothing sticks) Bake in preheated oven at 375 degrees, covered tightly with foil to keep things moist for about 30-40 minutes. Check and see how tender the peppers are – if they need more time to get tender then recover and bake longer. I like to finish my peppers by removing the cover and baking about 10-15 mins just to get a little brown on top.

 

 

Show Me The Beef!

Sorry mom , but I love a good steak sandwich! And this one was made by my husband so I love it even more!

He started by marinating a London Broil cut overnight in one of those “flavor injector” packaged marinades. It must  a “guy thing” to use those, it just sounds masculine and impressive!

To prepare the sandwiches, he fired up the grill, cooked it perfectly, sliced it thin and added some grilled mushrooms as well before piling it all onto some toasted, cheesy-topped “scali” bread!

open face steak sandwich

The only way this sandwich could be better is with some juicy sliced garden tomatoes

My Perfect Supper

Everybody has one. For some it might be simple and for others it could be quite gourmet.

For me it always have to involve tomatoes in some way. And beef.

There is just something magical about that combination that really works for me. Any combination will do: from meatloaf and ketchup all the way to a more “high-brow” Beef tenderloin stuffed with sun-dried tomatoes! I love it all!

Somewhere in the middle of homespun and gourmet is where my simple, perfect supper is:

perfect supper

Grilled steak with juicy sliced fresh tomatoes (Big slices of “brandywine” variety are best but really any tomato works) and a simple potato salad, best enjoyed on a perfect New England summer evening, on the porch.

 

What’s your idea of a perfect supper?

Back To Basics

Before TV networks were devoted to food, endless magazines dedicated food and in general a whole niche industry revolving around food (I am not complaining) there was… well just some basic recipes and every once in a while some relative or friend of the family might have a twist on a basic recipe.

Sometimes I just like to revisit the basics.

basic pasta salad

Nothing is more basic than standard pasta salad. This kind of pasta salad is as simple as it gets and in its “heyday” was the star of the summer side dishes. It still a great simple salad, it’s just been forgotten amid all the fancy variations these days. The only thing “new” about it is the tri-color rotini. (Remember when pasta only came in “white” and the tricolor was revolutionary? I do.)

The ingredient list is simple: boiled, drained and cooled al dente pasta, diced green bell pepper, diced red onion, diced pepperoni and a bottle of your favorite Italian dressing. This salad is easy and can feed a crowd. But it can be the basis for some other more exotic ideas too. Add sun-dried tomatoes and cubed mozzarella for a twist on antipasti. Add feta,olives and pepperoncini for a Greek-inspired version. Substitute the pepperoni  with chickpeas for a vegetarian version. You get the idea. Make it  your own.

or leave it as a good, solid basic.

 

Production Tip

As with all pasta salads, its good to dress it liberally with the dressing while the pasta is just a tiny bit still warm. Refrigerate, taste after a while and add a bit more dressing in. The pasta really soaks up the flavor if you do it this way.

Sully’s Sauce

My husband always said “Sully made the best sauce!”

“Sully” (a nickname for his last name of “Sullivan”) was good friend of my husband’s father and a central figure from the neighborhood back in the day, so when my husband mentioned that Sully’s daughter Karen had recently come across the recipe card for his sauce, I knew immediately I had to make it.

What better way to pay homage to fathers who are no longer with us then by recreating something so special and lost in time?

sullys recipe

I just love the “here’s what’s cookin” part of this card – don’t you?!

I asked if there was a “back-side” to the card that might give away his technique but no such luck. Only Sully knows how it all went together originally, but I took my best guess and here is how I did it…

I used 85/15 blend ground beef and started it browning in a hot, dry pan so that I could decide how much fat I wanted to leave in the pan. I got the meat browned and decided to spoon off most of the fat. I chose to re-hydrate some fat back in the meat in the form of the 2 tablespoons of olive oil. I am not sure at what point in the process Sully would have used the olive oil, perhaps right at the beginning while browning the meat? or maybe he used it to get the onions and garlic started first? Wish I knew.

Anyway after the olive oil went in, I added in a dash of salt/pepper, onions (2 cups!) and garlic and let those soften a bit before I added in the dry spices to toast a minute. After that I added in the tomato paste and gave that a minute to cook a bit. I de-glazed the pan with the wine. (1 whole cup!)

Next up: the tomatoes. I am certain that by Sully noting that these were “imported” he meant the famed “San Marzano” tomatoes so that is what used and I do think it makes a difference. Also I know that everybody has their own texture technique – some squish the canned tomatoes in their hands, some break them up with a spoon, some use scissors. I broke up 4 of the 6 cups with kitchen scissors, cutting up the whole canned tomatoes into small chunks right in their own sauce from the can. For the last 2 cups I actually used my immersion blender to puree it (not too much) so the whole 6 cups I added in ended up being saucy but with small chunks. I hope Sully would approve.

By now the whole creation was thick, yummy and begging to be tasted, so I did and adjusted the salt and pepper and turned the heat down to barely a simmer. I let it simmer with the lid on tight for about an hour. (keeping the lid on keeps things from drying out, but if it looks too dry, just add in a little water) I let it simmer another hour with the lid slightly off to allow it to actually thicken up a bit as mine was pretty juicy.

By then the delicious smell wafting through the house was more than we could take, so we boiled up some pasta and it was time…

sullys sauce

A special thank you to daughter Karen for letting me have the privilege to re-create her father’s famous sauce! And a happy father’s day to all the dads out there – the ones with us and the ones who have left us.

 

Interested in more ‘Irish-Italian” cooking?? Me too… read more about it here!

 

Author’s note: If you don’t want to use the Chianti wine – I would recommend using a cup of low sodium beef stock with a generous splash or two of red wine vinegar to give it that tangy richness that the wine adds.

 

Fruit Cubes

When I have extra fruit that I might not get to in time I like to puree it and freeze it for later use.  You can just simply puree the washed, clean fruit and freeze it or add some honey or sugar to it before freezing for instant drink mixes!

Certainly I didn’t invent this great idea but I do like to inspire and remind folks that it is a perfect way to have fruit on hand for blending smoothies, flavoring ice teas or my favorite adult beverage… “boat drinks!”

I use small 2-3 ounce containers so each one is just a portion size.

I use small 2-3 ounce containers so each one is just a portion size. (Make sure to leave a little room at the top for expansion!)