Corn & Tomatoes AGAIN

If you know me, you know I am obsessed with tomatoes.  By September 2013 I had already posted 75 times about tomatoes. I have lost count now.

And nothing goes better with tomatoes than corn! (and steak) I’m always looking for a twist on the corn and tomatoes pairing but this one might be a bit of a stretch.

Corn meal dusted fried chicken and a fresh tomato & vegetable “Ragu.”

plated chicken dish

Just use the standard “FEBruary” technique ( Flour, Egg, Breading) but replace the flour with fine corn meal and the breading with regular corn meal. (Doesn’t everybody have 2 kinds of corn meal in their pantry? LOL!) Oh and add some fine grated Parmesan cheese to the breading part to give it some yummy! (don’t to forget to season with salt and pepper!)

Now for the veggies! Garden fresh tomatoes are key. I happen to have some yellow and red!

Just start with a pan of hot olive oil and throw everything in…Its a quick process ..maybe 8-10 minutes total! ( you don’t want to over cook the asparagus!)

Here’s a couple other of my “twists” on corn and tomatoes! Here, Here and Here!


It’s The Most Wonderful Time of The Year!

Nope not Christmas… tomato season!!

This year my “supersonics” just keep on giving and although not quite as big as promised… (I blame that on the gardener not the garden) they are prolific! And the little yellow “pear” tomatoes are happily producing a handful a day at this point!

from the garden

After a while there are only so many BLTs you can eat before you need a chance of pace…


What? Wait?!!! did I really just write that? I never get tired of a BLT!

But the ugly truth is that when the tomatoes are producing faster than you can make sandwiches, there is only one thing left to do….


(or “gravy” as we like to say around Boston.) Here is all you need for a simple sauce…

assembled ingredients

Brown up the meats in a heavy bottom cast enamel pan in some olive oil, turn the heat down a bit and add the finely chopped garlic, dried spices and tomato paste. Let them “bloom” for a couple of minutes and de-glaze the pan with the chopped fresh tomatoes. I like to smooth things out with a tablespoon of sugar and of course don’t forget the salt & pepper. Note that I do coat the pork roast with plenty of salt, pepper and a little bit of onion powder before I brown it to a nice crust on all sides. The sausage is fine as is.

sauce in the making

Sauce in the making!

I like to let the whole thing simmer for at least 4 hours on lowish-medium heat and only serve it when the pork roast is basically fork tender. If you like a smoother sauce, remove the meats for a minute and take an immersion blender to the whole thing until it’s your level of smooth. Also I leave the seeds and skin on my tomatoes but you could easily poach and peel the tomatoes and strain the seeds out if that is your desire.

The finished sauce freezes beautifully and when you take some out around Christmas time it truly will be “the most wonderful time of the year” again!


Back Yard Adventures

I recently went on an adventure with my back yard grill.

I made turkey burgers.

A turkey burger hardly seems like an adventure but in my red-meat eating household, a turkey burger is a big adventure!

I looked up a few recipes and decided on a bit of a “Jamaican” influence for the flavor profile. I added in apple sauce to keep it moist, shredded carrot for texture and some unusual spices like nutmeg and ginger.

I used about a 1.25 lbs of regular ground turkey (white meat) and added a small onion which I whizzed up in the food processor till it was basically juice and a 4 0z snack cup of apple sauce plus one med carrot shredded finely. I threw in a beaten egg to hold it together and add even more fat/moisture. The spice blend was a 1/4 tsp each of nutmeg & ginger. 1 tsp of granulated garlic, plenty of ground black pepper and 2 tsp of seasoned salt. I also threw in a few hefty dashes of my favorite smokey hot sauce! The mix was pretty wet/loose but I wanted to keep it gluten-free and not add the usual bread crumbs so instead I added about 3 tb of rice flour, stirring them in 1 tablespoon at a time to carefully judge consistency. I think some chopped fresh cilantro might have been nice but I didn’t have any.

I formed the patties and grilled them on the a well-oiled backyard grill adding some Munster cheese! Ketchup or extra hot sauce is optional!

Health Food

You can read about it here but just so you know…. “Salisbury Steak” is considered “health food!”

And so I made some health food the other night.

First I formed the patties with lots of flavor mixed in and browned them up in a heavy bottom skillet. Remove from the pan and set aside.

Next up the all important mushroom browning. And onions. Don’t forget about the onions!

Finally be sure to deglaze the pan with flavorful liquids. Add back in the patties to warm through (if they have grown cold) and serve.

The recipe

1.25 lbs +/- Ground Beef (I used 80-20 blend)

1/2 Tb Onion Powder

1/2 Tb Garlic Powder

1/2 Tb Penzey’s Prime Rib Seasoning

1/2 Tsp Season Salt

1/2 Tsp Ground Black Pepper

Mix all of the above and form oval patties ( I made 3) and fry in a heavy bottom pan with a little oil. (use your favorite type) Remove the patties and set aside with a foil cover. Add 1 small onion that has been diced very small and sauté a couple of minutes till soft. Add 1-1/2 cups chopped mushrooms (I used baby Portabellas) and sauté a few minutes till browned.

Deglaze the pan with: (whisk it all together first)

1.5 Cups Water

1/4 Cup Ketchup

2 tb Steak Sauce

1 Packet of Brown Gravy Mix ( low sodium is best)

Turn the heat down and add the patties back in till they are warmed through. Serve with starch and a green vegetable!


Potluck With A Southern Spin

I had the pleasure of attending a potluck surprise 50th anniversary party recently. It was held outdoors at a beautiful location called “Muster Field Farms.” The day was perfect, the couple was surprised and the food was delicious. Although many had come from all around the country to attend – this was in no-way a “southern” event. It was in fact a quintessential “New England” event. Taking place in central-west New Hampshire on a working farm and historical homestead from the late 1700s.

I brought 2 items: a southern spin on a 3-bean salad. Using green beans, corn and black-eyed peas. Fresh parsley and a light, bright sweet/sour dressing made this perfect to sit on the table on a hot day. (no mayo means no concerns)

My second item was dessert – a  “grape salad.”  This did require some all important refrigerator space until it was time to bring out the dessert including the anniversary cake! This salad was an adaptation of Trisha Yearwood’s recipe and it was a hit! Thanks Trisha!

grape salad 2

This is from a second batch I made for the photo shoot – sauce wasn’t as thick due to not measuring properly – but still delicious!

My adaptations included substituting Vanilla yogurt for the sour cream called for in the recipe. (I had forgotten to buy the sour cream!) I also used 12 ounces of cream cheese instead of the 8 ounces called for just to make sure the mix stayed thick!

Make sure you wash and DRY the grapes before you mix in the yummy stuff. This way it will stick to the fruit, coating it nicely.

Also be sure to add the topping (brown sugar and chopped pecans) just before serving otherwise the sugar will melt into the salad and lose its crunch!

Hot days, Cold Chicken

Finally I have come around to realize that is crazy to run the oven or stove top indoors when temperatures rise above 85 and the humidity is so thick you can barely lift your arm. Grill it or go out instantly become the only options.

A classic grilled chicken breast never goes out of style.

A fresh grilled corn, tomato, feta and parsley salad along side always makes a nice accessory.


The nice thing about a meal like this, the chicken can be eaten hot, warm or even cold.


If you already are grilling the chicken – make the effort to grill the corn too. Just shuck it and throw it on. Nothing fancy – keep an eye and turn when it’s charred a bit.

Typically I usually take the time to peel back the green leaves, carefully remove the silk, smooth back the green leaves and soak the corn in water for at least 20 minutes, then throw them on the hot grill to steam in their water-soaked jackets. This method is good too but requires more prep and doesn’t allow for the actually charring of the corn.

Pick your corn grilling method according to your time and patience!

Hot Days, Hot Chicken…

…because a hot day in July always seems like the perfect day to roast a chicken in the oven right?

Not really the best idea, but I had a craving! And a hankering for some sage which I grow in a pot in my back yard.

fresh sage from the garden

Ever since I started growing sage I am always looking for ways to incorporate it into lighter, summer-like food. But this day I just needed a really good roasted chicken.

I kept it simple adding only a high quality lemon pepper blend, additional fresh ground black pepper and sea salt. Half a stick of butter always make things juicy and tasty too.

sage-spices and butter

Fresh chopped sage, lemon-pepper blend, sea salt and ground black pepper

I used classic technique and massaged the butter and spices all over and under the skin. Roast at 425 degrees until your meat registers 160 degrees in the thigh and juices run clear. Some people bother to tuck and tie their bird but I didn’t bother this time – just a little bit of foil on the wing tips and drum tips to keep them from burning too much.

perfectly crispy skin!

perfectly crispy skin!

Bon Appétit!