Mr. Irish… Meet Mexican Corn

When you have been married to someone for 15 years, you think you know that person fairly well.

That is a bad assumption. There is something new to learn at any given moment. Like say when you are on a little vacation and he orders something that seems so unlikely for him to order and he LOVES it.

By now you are guessing that my Irish plain-eating husband tried and loved Mexican street corn! We ordered it in a fun little Mexican place in Florida and sure enough he loved it. He asked me if I could make this at home and of course I was all like…”does a duck like to swim?” OF COURSE I can make this!

So one night after our return from Florida I whipped up a batch.

mexican-corn.jpg

I thought they turned out pretty well and he thought so too. But there are a few things I would fine tune for the next batch.

  • Use fresh not frozen ( Don’t judge – it’s spring in New England – there’s no fresh local corn for like another 2 months!)
  • Chop the Cojita cheese MUCH smaller as I realized it will coat better and more evenly.
  • Season the Mexican crema a little less aggressively and so the ancho chili powder that I forgot to sprinkle on top can stand out better.

As for a recipe…

It’s pretty simple and there are a thousand versions out there but here is mine.

Ingredients:

Mexican crema – you can you usually find this in the Mexican foods section of the grocery store but if you can’t find it, just use mayonnaise thinned with a little water.

Cojita Cheese – this is like a Mexican version of feta. Salty and crumbly. If you are worried about salt levels try the Queso Fresca instead – it’s still crumbly but less salty.

Ancho Chili powder – worth the investment if you don’t have this on hand. But you could probably use a little regular chili powder instead.

Fresh limes – cut for squeezing over corn.

Fresh Cilantro – final chopped is best here.

Fresh corn cobs, par-cooked – (steam them or boil them or roast or microwave or whatever first so they are just past being raw. Don’t over cook)

Method:

Mix up some crema with salt, pepper and pinch of the ancho chili powder. Grill the corn, roll it/brush it with the crema. Now sprinkle the cheese on it. Sprinkle it with some ancho chili powder and finish it with cilantro and a squirt of lime juice.

 

 

 

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Never Boil Corn Again!

This week I fell in love with the internet all over again!

I was feeling lazy about getting out a giant pot, shucking the corn and steaming/boiling my corn on the cob. Ugh.

However, my desire for early corn (Florida corn) at this time of year outweighed my laziness so the big corn pot came out. And then I decided to procrastinate more and check the internet. There must be a better way, right?

And there was!!!

Cue angels singing!

Simply roast them on a sheet pan, in the husk, for 30 mins at 350 degrees. THAT’S IT!

look I will show you how easy….

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SOOOO easy! And the house fills with the most amazing smell of sweet corn roasting.

Now I can have my fix of “corn & tomatoes” much easier.

or “corn & pineapple” muffins!

or “chicken corn stew!”

or “corn, chive  & tomato omelets!”

 

Hot days, Cold Chicken

Finally I have come around to realize that is crazy to run the oven or stove top indoors when temperatures rise above 85 and the humidity is so thick you can barely lift your arm. Grill it or go out instantly become the only options.

A classic grilled chicken breast never goes out of style.

A fresh grilled corn, tomato, feta and parsley salad along side always makes a nice accessory.

dinner

The nice thing about a meal like this, the chicken can be eaten hot, warm or even cold.

TIP:

If you already are grilling the chicken – make the effort to grill the corn too. Just shuck it and throw it on. Nothing fancy – keep an eye and turn when it’s charred a bit.

Typically I usually take the time to peel back the green leaves, carefully remove the silk, smooth back the green leaves and soak the corn in water for at least 20 minutes, then throw them on the hot grill to steam in their water-soaked jackets. This method is good too but requires more prep and doesn’t allow for the actually charring of the corn.

Pick your corn grilling method according to your time and patience!

Spring Day 30: (Florida Corn)

Here in New England we have a saying… “knee-high by fourth of July!”

What we are referencing is the corn needs to be about “knee-high” in the fields in order for it to be on schedule for our typical growing season. This means local corn doesn’t really come into the stores until early august. (Maaaaybe late July if we had a warm spring and a farmer willing to take a gamble and plant early)

But if you are willing to contribute to a “carbon-footprint” you can have your “fresh” corn-on-the-cob in May, grown and flown in from Florida.

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Just one of those things that I must have!

(More from me about corn here and here!)

Corn Season

This time of year in New England fresh “Corn on the Cob” is king!

And while many people are busy thinking up new ways to use up all the Zucchini, I spend my time thinking up ways to eat more fresh corn!

The latest way…..

“Fresh corn pudding with roasted sweet potatoes & red bell pepper!”

(served with grilled steak or not)

final plate

 

The key here is the not only the 4 cups of fresh raw corn taken right off the cob, but the roasted sweet potato.

Sweet potatoes - Simply peeled, cubed, drizzled with oil, salt & pepper. Roast at 400 degrees till tender and browed a bit.

Sweet potatoes – Simply peeled, cubed, drizzled with oil, salt & pepper. Roast at 400 degrees till tender and browned a bit.

Tip: Scrub and roast your potatoes in the cool summer nights and make the corn pudding the next day or better yet if early morning is your thing, get it all done before the heat of the day sets in.

Another Tip: I like roasting potatoes or any veggies just to have on hand for quiche fillings, sandwich stuffers, omelets or quesadilla.

 

the recipe

2 cups cubed, roasted sweet potatoes

1 small-medium sweet red bell pepper diced

1 cup small dice white onion

4 cups fresh corn kernels (be sure to reap the “milk” from the cobs too!)

1 heaping TB fresh chopped sage

1/2 cup melted and slightly cooled butter

4 medium size eggs (adjust according if yours are smaller or bigger)

1 Tsp Baking Powder

1 1/4 cup finely ground corn meal (yellow or white okay)

1 1/4 cup “half and half”* or Whole milk     *I used fat-free because that is what I had but I think it would be richer with full fat.

salt and pepper to taste

preheat oven to 375 degrees and spray an 8×12 baking dish with non-stick cooking spray.

mix the potatoes, onion, bell pepper, corn kernels and corn milk together and dump into the baking dish. In another bowl mix the butter, eggs, sage and baking powder together. Alternately whisk in the cornmeal and milk (or half and half) – watching consistency. The batter should be thick but still very pourable. You may end up using more or less of one of these two ingredients. Salt and pepper should be added in and pour over the veggies in the baking dish. Cover tightly with foil and bake 30 minutes, uncover and bake 20 more mins. Baking time may vary – the edges should be brown and the middle firm but soft – kinda like quiche.

Serve hot, warm or room temperature.

 

Superfecta Of Summer

Corn and tomatoes are one of  my favorite parings and I have written about them before….here and here.

This time I paired them in a quiche. Easy and summer-y this quiche tastes like a fancy brunch dish and is so light that you feel almost like you are eating healthy! (never mind the eggs, cream and cheese in the mix!)

summer quiche The key was the fresh corn – sweet and in season now –  I carved it raw off the cob making sure to include all the “milk” into the bowl as well. I had never used a soft, fresh cheese like goat cheese before, in a quiche, but I had some already crumbled in the fridge and decided to throw it in. The fresh basil and cherry tomatoes cut in half rounded out this trifecta (or perhaps its a “superfecta?”) of ingredients. The moist goat cheese added a bit of luscious-ness to it.The quiche is rich but not heavy.

Production Notes

I just use a store-bought crust that I blind bake for 10-15 minutes so the crust will be crisp and not soggy. I also firmly believe that glass pie dishes get the best result with crust. For the liquids I simply start with 6 whole eggs and about a cup of dairy – milk cream or even half and half. I fill the cooled crust with the filling of the choice and carefully pour the liquid mix over it all. Be careful not to pour to fast as sometimes the liquid doesn’t get into the nooks and crannies as fast as it should and you can easily spill over the edges! S & p to taste.

Bake in a preheated 375 degree oven until set in middle. Cool a bit before slicing.

quiche ingredients

The “superfecta” of summer ingredients!

 

Mother’s Day On The Porch

This year Mother’s Day also turned out to be the “season opener” for her deck. And nothing is better than an early evening supper on the porch of corn and tomatoes…

And of course I brought her “flowers” (the edible kind!)

rose

The next morning we enjoyed last night’s leftovers in a whole new way…a savory breakfast bread pudding!

I simply cubed up about 8 slices of good quality bread ( something alike a “pullman loaf” but really anything you have would do) and let them get all toasty and dry in a low oven for a few minutes. I piled them into a sprayed oven-proof dish and threw in all the rest of the leftover corn and tomatoes. I added some generous dashes of dried oregano, a couple good pinches of garlic powder, salt and pepper to taste, some pats of butter ( maybe like 4) and about 3 ounces of sharp cheddar. (Some grated and some chunked.) Now the wet stuff: whisk 6 large eggs with about 2 cups whole milk and make sure to use the back of your knife down the corn cobs and get all that delicious “milk” hiding in the cobs.  Pour it all over the top of everything.

Into a preheated 375 degree oven – covered tight with foil- for about 20-25 mins. No peeking under the foil. Remove the cover when the liquid is firm and edges just starting to take on some brown. (this is nice and easy to see in a glass baking dish!) Let it baked uncovered 8-10 mins longer just to dry out the top a bit as needed. Remove from the oven and let it cool a bit, just like lasagna, this is better served warm and not piping hot!

Read about my other “corn and tomato” adventures here!